Only Nominally a Knitting Blog. But Who Cares?

  • One L short of normal.

Stat Counter


Become a Fan

TypePad Profile

Get updates on my activity. Follow me on my Profile.

Twitter Updates

    follow me on Twitter

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner

    « Prep Work, My Style | Main | Break Out The Champagne (or the Kentucky Bourbon?) »

    Monday, July 30, 2007

    Comments

    Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

    Aarlene

    Maybe that OTHER kind of daisy kept away the marauding bugs?

    Your flowers are just gorgeous and the veggies are making me hungry.

    If only you could squish your problem neighbors.

    Kristen

    Oh Japanese beetles--evil bastards! Yup, just carry a bucket of soapy water and knock the mothers into it. (I'm too wimpy to crush them with my bare hands.) I'm so sorry! Unfortunately those pheromone lures are only useful if they are far away from your garden and the only attractive thing around. :( BTW, I decided on ladybugs. They should be shipped tomorrow. Heh, heh, heh!

    Anne

    I love that word... Ratatouille. (Pronounced cha-ta-TOO-yeh. The French laughed at my pronunciation and gave me lessons.) You can have your ratatouille with nouilles (noodles--NOO-yeh) but you will probably not want to have them with frogs' legs (cuisses de grenouille--gre-NOO-yeh).

    (Sorry--I've been watching the Tour de France.)

    sandy

    Oddly, I'm hungry for soup and ratouille right now. But it's 6:30 am.
    Those Japanese beetles (not Beatles) will not be singing "I'm in the mood for love" anymore.

    Manise

    I'm with you on the violent murdering of Japanese beetles- I grabbed a handful last week and felt their crawling inside my fist. I thought it was odd that one was biting me- turns out I accidentally got a visiting beneficial wee bee in the mix who stung me on the fleshy part inside of my left ring finger. Poor thing! I am finding because they emerged late this year and that their favorite food to fornicate in , rosa rugosa, is mostly past blooming they are doing in my astilbe, basil, swiss chard, daylily and Cosmo flowers. The squishing will commence once it stops raining! Oh, over grown zucchini make for good soup btw.

    Laurie

    THe Japanese beetles are the modern day scourge of the gardener. I drown 'em.

    I love your swath of daylilies. Beautiful grouping of color! And yeah, midsummer is defined by Echinacea.

    Carole

    I've been making soup, too. Cream of Arugula (which looks a bit like bile but tastes good) and Swiss Chard with Lentil. They are in the freezer for this fall. Mmmmm.

    Jean E.

    I hate Japanese beetles. Used to have a very nice raspberry patch until the beetles moved in. They also have ruined my crabapple and linden trees. Grrrr. Your soup sounds pretty good, though!

    margene

    Ah the drama that is Norma's garden. Your flowers are so beautiful. This time of year the flowers are on the wan, as the heat takes its toll.

    naomi

    I like the ambition of that bean vine. :)

    Isela

    Darn beetles...squish, squish away!

    minnie

    doesn't it make sense that japanese beetles go for asiatic day lilies?

    it still stinks, though!

    good luck with the bug wars.

    and when can i come for dinner?

    Marcia Cooke

    Your lilies are gorgeous. Deer dessert in this neck of the woods, so I can't grow them, unfortunately. Or roses or azaleas or tulipsor hostas. I hate deer almost as much as I hate woodchucks. Strangely, we don't have a huge problem with the JB's. You've gotta admit they're easier to catch and kill than my critters!

    claudia

    I'll send you my beetle-eating mama robin.

    elaine

    ugh-beetles. my sister-in-law's garden in sharon is being overrun with them this year too. she's plopping them in soapy water when she finds them (soap changes the surface tension of the water so they cannot skate on top, they sink into their watery grave).

    we don't have beetles, but SOMETHING is nibbling at our basil this year and if this year's pesto production is off because of it, heads will roll!

    at least we have seemed to have escaped the tomato hornworm issue we've had the last two years.

    good luck with the beetle genocide project!

    kmkat

    Japanese beetles are not a problem here (I'm not sure I've ever even seen one) but gypsy moths seems to be on the upswing. Nature is one never-ending drama. The dogs keep the deer away; maybe I could sic 'em on the marauding arthropods.

    I love scented flowers, and Asiatic lilies make me swoon with delight. Enjoy yours!

    regina

    We've been overrun by something, though I haven't seen any japanese beetles. One of my lilac bushes and two of my lilies have holes chewed clean through all the leaves. My neighbor, who is a far more experienced gardener than I, said he suspects slugs, but I have no clue. New Jersey is in the grips of Gypsy Moths this year, and they're just running rampant over our forests. Drama indeed. Your flowers are lovely, though, and your soup sounds wonderful.

    Rachel

    It's weird to see turnips in the summer. We (Southerners) usually eat turnips as a cool weather crop, eating the tender greens when they're small before the roots have time to develop. I know the rest of the country is wondering why the heck anyone wants to eat those greens and leave the roots (we do occasionally throw the roots in the pot of greens, too, if we have 'em), but when young, they aren't bitter, no more than collards or chard.

    But I know that those who love their mashed turnip roots are strict devotees. And you get to have it in the summertime, too! A nice bonus. Bon appetit!

    Sneaksleep

    I have been enjoying a summer garden vicariously through you this year--thanks! If we are still in the same house next spring, I am definitely planting some veggies. Hope you figure out a good solution the Japanese Beelte problem!

    Carrie

    Bleh. The idea that you actually crush bugs between your fingers on purpose gives me the violent willies. Bleh. I don't know what the adults look like, but the larvae are hideous and disgusting and should not be allowed in the world at all.

    jenifleur

    I have about a dozen black walnut trees and untold numbers of babies. I also have a population of japanese beetles that would make you faint-my neighbors all use sevin dust, I don't, so I am like a tahitian vacation for them-but I've never once seen a japanese beetle on my walnuts. I wonder why. They're attempting to destroy my Altheas, they've eaten the basil down to the roots and there's even some weed in the pasture I haven't identified that they love, so maybe they're distracted?

    Want me to send you some black walnuts to plant? Just don't get them anywhere near your tomatoes.

    Tracey

    Yes, actually those baited traps only work if you give them to a neighbor about a two blocks away. Then it will work. Otherwise nope.
    Love the turnip soup!

    Carol

    May you acquire many notches on your beetle killing weapon! The garden looks glorious and yes, thank you, I'm starving now!

    Beverly

    I too enjoy a good killing spree of Japanese Beetles. I prefer to wear a tight-fitting pair of latex gloves as I pick and flick the bastards into a glass jar filled with amonia/water of bleach/water mix (they die more slowly and painfully, I think and they so deserve it!). I just have to be careful not to spill the toxic liquid on my plants. One thing those yellow traps are good for: You can collect a goodly amount of dead beetles, puree them in a blender (need I say this is a blender dedicated to dead beetles?) with a small amount of water, then use this disgusting mixture and spray your plants with it...the beetles do NOT like the odor of their dead relatives and will stay away from sprayed plants (I have to confess I haven't tried this as I only have the one blender, but doesn't it sound like good bastard-killing fun?).

    Cathy

    The flowers are beautiful! Our Purple Conflowers are blooming too right now. I'm so sorry about the bettles. I totally understand your adjective of choice . . . we have fucking rabbits. My son has even picked that up too.

    Cookie

    There's nothing wrong with being a mood. Wanna join me in a killing spree later?

    michelle

    Norma, I'm so in agreement with on the Japanese beatle situation. I wanted to make some Rose petal jam, like yours. But they've have completely ruined every petal and bud to no end. The roses that have blossomed have been sprayed with a pesticide so they are worthless for jam. I'm so pissed. Then of course we get rain and the pesticide is useless and before I can hit them again the JB have eaten the new buds. It's discouraging. Also I've been battling Orange slugs. They have been feasting on my dahlias. I set out some beer traps for them, you should see them make a bee-line to the beer. Crazy. I think I must have "red neck garden slugs". : )

    JessaLu

    I was watching a rerun of Gardening by the Yard last night and they had a tip on there to use basil tea to get rid of Japanese Beetles. You steep a bunch of basil in a jar of water (like sun tea only basil-y-er) and then spray it on your plants. Apparently they don't like the taste and they move on...

    Sil

    I hope you didn't but those f*ing beetles into the soup pot?! That would qualify as an "interesting" ingredient, no?

    Debi

    This whole post with it's creepy crawlie content has me so scheeved I'm afraid to walk outside :)

    I hope you can salvage your lovely garden!

    The comments to this entry are closed.

    Services


    • 319712_342932112443374_212147665521820_818930_878689603_n

    Red Scarf Project Blog

    Blog powered by Typepad
    Member since 04/2004
    Blog Widget by LinkWithin